Tag: supreme

A big part of Supreme’s program is based around working with people that either have a great history (in the limelight) or with people that deserve to have their moment in the sun. Mike Hill is not an “in the spotlight kind of guy” but if we (the skateboard community) ever decide to make a hall of fame he should be inducted into it.

So instead of googling “Mike Hill skateboarding” for you, this time we will leave it up to you to decide if you want to invest your time into someone Supreme is investing their time in.

After Donald Trump’s election, last year Alex Olson told me.

“People think Punk music is coming back.”

I had to stop and think about it, the general attitude has become more punk in recent times. But I didn’t really see an increase in the Punk music I did, however, start to notice another musical current rising up (pun intended). Caribbean music, especially Reggae has made its way into the video side of contemporary skateboard culture.

Punk, Reggae and skateboarding the links between these forms of expression are not that outlandish, despite a strong difference in style they are closer than you might think.

Let’s start with connecting Punk and Reggae, this snippet supplies a short explanation into their worlds.

Now that we established that there is some common ground between the two scenes.  The next step is to find a connection to our own sub-culture.

For those of you that are aware of skateboarding’s history, you know that skateboarding started as a DYI (Do It Yourself) culture. The DIY attitude was firmly embedded into us from the moment a pair of roller skate axles were screwed onto some wood and it continues to live on in every one of us who chooses to customize his or her board or fix a spot.

Even though we did a lot of research it is hard to pinpoint the moment when Reggae entered skateboarding. We did, however, find an early example of a part set to skateboarding.


Jef Hartsel one off the first part set to Reggae music (World Industries, Rubbish Heap, 1989).

Since it is hard to pinpoint the exact moment, we can only guess. We do know that places like New York, have had a strong Caribbean community since the early 1900’s so it could be that it happened when skateboarding got known in these communities cultures collided and merged. Black skateboarders historically talked about a backlash withing their own community who considered skateboarding a white activity. But as skateboarding started to become popularized and it had its first peak the diversification process had already started and parts like the one bellow where the result.


Keith “Huf” Hufnagel’s part in Penal Code is an early example of how to combine skateboarding and reggae music (1996).

Then things seemed to take a backburner for a while and truth be told, my generation did not grow up watching these parts. To us, Reggae was this cliché thing about weed and dreadlocks. It felt like a very small thing in our skateboard world, There were some moments I.E: when Tosh Townend skated to Lee Scratch Perry or John Cardiel who skated to Sizzla but to be honest it felt more like a one-off thing to us.


An entire brand dedicated to the genre (Satori, Roots and Culture, 2004).


The now legendary I-Path promo (2005).

In the mid-2000’s things seemed to be more divided, not only the image of the brand but the image of the skater became increasingly important. It was the start of what we see today, you can be a super good skater, but are you relatable, inspiring and do kids want to skate, dress and be like you?

Some brands were basing or at the very least connecting their image to Caribbean culture. In doing that they spoke to a new audience and created a platform for Reggae style skaters I.E. Matt Rodriguez.


Niell Brown in “The 103 Video.” (2010)

At the end of the 2000’s things started to change back to Penal Code times, there were multiple videos that for lack of a better term casually used Reggae music in people’s parts.

One of the videos that had a big influence on me was “The 103 Video” A video with fluent editing and an even better song selection, it changed my opinion on Reggae/Dub/Dancehall. It wasn’t that I couldn’t hear the quality or that I was incapable of liking the music but the video combined the music in such a way that I started to see the diversity instead of the genre’s clichés.

https://vimeo.com/113099306
A recent resurgence of Caribbean flows (Johnny Wilson, Paych, 2014).

Today use of Caribbean music has become commonplace in both skateboarding and pop culture as a whole, Supreme used it in their videos and collections and pop star Drake works with Caribbean artists, talks about Caribbean “Tings” on tracks with a Caribbean style rhythm.

2017 will show if this will continue as a mainstream movement or if it will return to the fringes, either way, we suggest you spend some time doing your googles, reading up and engulfing yourself in the world of Caribbean culture.


Leave it up to Bill Strobeck to further influence the youth (Supreme, Pussy Gangster, 2016).

Text by Roland Hoogwater
Images by Supreme

Genesis Evans just put out this video of some of his well-known Supreme friends skating and Dorking around the city of Angels in short L.A.

Featuring: Alex Olson, Aidan Mackey, Chris Milic, Rowan Zorrila, Nik Stain, Logan Lara, Hugo Boserup, Cyrus Bennet and much more.

Sage is one of our favorites not only because of his skating, his vibe is what really sets him apart from all others. This video part really combines those aspects without even saying a word or hard selling the shoes (That looks great btw). Anyway watch this part, put on Illmatic afterwards and book a spring flight to NYC.

Read our interview from issue 54 here.

It is great when people manage to realize their dreams. We first heard about PACCBET (pronounced “rassvet”) when we were out in Moscow working on our “Project Russia” issue. While there we met both Gosha Rubchinskiy and Tolia, the latter told us about their idea to create a new brand next to the Gosha Rubchinskiy brand.

Now we all hear people talking about creating something of their own but not many manage to actually do it.  Especially in the way that PACCBET had its start with an event at Dover Street Market. If you are aware of Gosha’s work you probably know that it is important to him to observe and create his own moods, departing from this point he manages to develop his work. Because Tolia and Gosha have known each other for quite some time they also know how to create and work together, navigating between different moods and in the end creating PACCBET, a brand to watch.

Watch the PACCBET promo bellow and click here to read our “Project Russia” interviews with both Gosha and Tolia.

 

Ever wonder why those Supreme videos are so good? It is because the man behind them has had a long history of working for and filming with some of the best to ever do it. Bobshirt interviews are some of the best in-depth interviews and Transworld definitely made the right move by picking them up. Enjoy Fat Bill and Anthony Pappalardo shooting the shit for old times sake.

Sage Elsesser had a really great time traveling around the world on the Converse One Star World Tour last year. Time to have a little look back with the man who is in the habit of approaching spots the supposed “wrong” way.

Photos by Jon Coulthard

Bildschirmfoto 2016-07-28 um 16.36.26

Bildschirmfoto 2016-07-28 um 16.36.43

You might also like to have a look at our interview with Sage from PLACE Mag #54.

Normally this footage seems to be reserved for Instagram montages but somehow Mr. Strobeck decided to make an entire montage from the Paris leftovers. Seems that Dill had a hand in choosing the song for this one (Mr. Wonder being his favorite artist) and we are happy to see Stevie shine in a montage like this one. Sit down and enjoy all your favorites in this 4-minute throwback to Supreme’s winter months in Paris.

“Carter it is fucking Friday the fucking 10th!” As we sat down to talk about our favorite Dill moments, we realized everyone seemed to love the intro from Alien Workshops “Photosyntheses” when Jason get’s a call from Chris Carter to put the heat on him to get footage because they wanted him to have “last part”. The rest is history. The Dill we met in Paris is a different one. You can almost say he seems to be grown up…in a very Dill way of course. This man is a good-looking, very polite man and one of the most influential figures in skateboarding worldwide. Jason Dill is leading the cool guys and everyone wants a piece of him. Here is a talk with the one and only Dill-Man about République, Bill and Paris in general.

by Benjamin Deberdt

There have been rumours going around Supreme was interested in opening a shop in Berlin. Is this ever going to happen?

That might just be a rumour… about a year, year and a half ago, I spent a little over a month there. I love Berlin. The Paris store is now open. We had a great opening and I hope people are happy to have us.

Who is the woman in the photo-print from your last FA Board?

The one and only Michelle. Passport photo, 2008. First loves last.

Does Chloë Sevigny have her board set up at home?

Yeah, she keeps it right by her front door so all her friends see it when they walk in… ha, no, I dunno. I know she has one or two of her decks…yeah Chloë, you’re the best!

Strobeck seems to be in love with this one Kid (Leo) from République. What is so different about the French youth culture?

Bill has a very large set of eyes. He sees little things that maybe most people don’t take the time to see. Actually what Bill does is meet a kid like Leo at République and tell him “hey, you’re pretty cool”. That goes a long way when you are 14 and an adult says “keep doing your thing”. He told me all about Little Leo– this epic kid I’m gonna meet at République. I met Leo and he said “Hey man” in a way that almost mimicked an American twang, and sure enough he was as cool as Bill said. We took him skating with us a couple times outside of République. Him, JB, and another kid from here, they’d just come skate if it was a mellow day. They say the funniest shit… Little Leo is just funny. He’s a good kid… Nos, the little guy at the beginning of the Pussy Gangster video is an epic epic kid. Liam and his brother Tom, August, all of the République kids. I just like how these kids live and skate and that they all have certain things that make them particularly special.

And what’s so good about République?

Anywhere there is one collective spot where people can skate near the center of any city is a good thing…and it’s Karl’s spot motherfucker. [Karl Salah]

So, could you see yourself living in Paris? Do you speak the language?

You know I don’t speak French, silly. Live here? Shit I’ve been here a month, I’ve got over two more weeks to go… I think I could live here though. I’m starting to get beat over the head with ultra modern Americanism at home: the pending elections, daily shootings in public, fuckin’ assholes all over the television and in the news, bad looks, freaked out faces… show me a populist city that’s not mega freaked out these days. I really like it here, although since I speak so little French, I get discriminated against for being American and not speaking French almost everyday here. I completely welcome it. It’s my fault for not knowing how to order a meal in the native tongue…only an American asks for extra ice. Hate me… Comme si comme ça!

How is it going out skating with Kevin Rodrigues?

Oh man Kevin is cool. I like Kev. Who doesn’t? He’s just doing his thing hard and running his own deal, I really like what he does on a board. I have had a really great time skating with him, Roman, Greg, Vincent, Manuel, Val, Alex, all them dudes have so much fun when we are out skating…it’s hard to explain and I kinda hate the word “fun”, but these motherfuckers have FUN…them Bloby’s. It was quite a filming trip here to Paris watching the FA kids from Sage to Nak to Tyshawn and KB skate with them. Made me feel old but happy for skateboarding’s future.

Who is your favourite European skater at the moment and why?

I’m gonna have to still pin that one on Lucas Puig…cause he’s really just too ill. He does it again and again. His tricks are like bullets or some shit.

The best thing about having a Supreme shop in Paris?

Lots of things. My old buddy Samir [Krim] being so heavily involved and his history alone when it comes to this city. Also just what will come of it being available to the younger dudes in the years to come…I think people will be surprised how it will develop over time. I’d like to thank Samir for telling me to come back out and film…thanks bud.

You look very healthy lately. Is it the French food? Haha.

I do? Ha, thanks, ummmm… I eat at Chez Justine a lot…shout out to Jon Monie (French skater and owner of the bar).

Once again somebody took the time to create a little Supreme style compilation clips. There is something to it though scrolling through Strobeck’s feed and collection little snippets here and there. You get Fat Bill’s style of filming with the music style of the creator (or not), but in the end something new is created. Remixing or collaging is, was and will remain one of todays most important movements in and out of skateboarding.

Before I flew to Russia, I was sitting in the PLACE office watching YouTube videos when I came across this small documentary about Tolia. In it, he talks about growing up in Moscow, living with his father, being creative and how skateboarding helps him express himself. It was quite a good video portrait, but at the same time meeting people face to face can be a totally different experience. With our trip to Russia, I would have the chance to find out.

We arrived in Moscow on a Wednesday and went out to party with the crew on Thursday. In a bar I met Tolia in person and we instantly hit it off. We talked, smoked cigarettes, danced, and before the night was over, he told me that we were now friends. And he was right, we had become friends in a matter of hours.

I got to know him even better during our time in Sochi. And I soon realized that Tolia lives by his own vision: he knows what he wants and how he wants it. He is aware of what’s going on and is not afraid to be straightforward and verbalize his opinions. That’s a good thing, sometimes I feel that people hold themselves back so they can sustain a public image. But not Tolia –as you can read in this interview.

toli_ts

50-50 to Tailslide.


So let’s start off with the most important question, how did you learn to cook?

When I started living with my now ex-girlfriend. I felt it was important to cook, we had a good kitchen in the apartment and so I started making simple salads and pasta dishes at first. From there I progressed into preparing different types of meat. Cooking is easy when you cook every day and keep trying to make new dishes. At the same time, I might have gotten the gift of cooking from my grandmother. She is an amazing cook.

Who is in the Epic Aces Crew?

(laughs) You heard about the Epic Aces crew? It was started by some guys from Saint Petersburg as a joke. We started calling ourselves Epic Aces. We took the logo from a cocktail brand and we had plans to make some clothes, but as of now that hasn’t happened. Now it’s just an Instagram account so if you want know who the Epic Aces crew is – check out @Epicaces account and look at the people it follows.

Tell me about your friendship with Gosha Rubchinskiy.

I met Gosha about six to seven years ago. I met him at a casting for one of his [runway fashion] shows. I got casted and started to walk in his show. So I walked in his first show, then his second one, and then we started to become friends. Nowadays I help him with his work, for instance with the Vans collabo. I also helped do work on a show and sometimes we just talk about the things he makes. I’m kind off like Gosha’s right hand man.

You are also connected to Supreme – how did that happen?

I met the guys from Supreme in Moscow. They were there to work with Gosha on a lookbook for Grind Magazine. Grind is a magazine from Japan and Supreme always shoots a lookbook or an editorial for each new collection they do. So that is where the connection started and this year I went out to Paris for this shoot.

You connected with the scene over there pretty well.

When I was out there, there where a lot of people visiting Paris. Alex Olson and a couple of the Bianca Chandon guys were in town, I met all the Blobbys, and I became good friends with Kevin Rodgrigues, Greg Cuadrado, Guillaume Périmony, and the rest of the crew. Those were a fun two weeks, I love those guys. Those guys go out to and try to learn a new trick every time. I think the skate scene in Paris is the most influential scene at the moment.

There is also a Dutch connection right?

Yeah, I met Noah Bunink last summer. He was booked to walk in a show for Gosha and I met him through that. We started to become good friends. He’s actually my English teacher (laughs). Noah is also a really good creative skater. I like his style. He can skate everywhere.

Coincidentally, a lot of those guys skate for Converse and you recently made the move from Vans to Cons. What happened?

I skated for Vans for about three-and-a-half years. The old team manager, Vitalik, is a good friend of mine. He did a lot for skateboarding in Russia. He would host competitions, helped to get skateparks built, and organized a lot of tours for us to go on. The problems started when Vitalek left Vans to go work at Adidas. Vans waited for some time before they appointed a new person and when they did, this person didn’t have that connection with skating. So for the last year-and-a-half, the situation wasn’t that cool anymore. We only did one tour and it wasn’t set up like it used to with Vitalek. I still think Vans is doing good in Russia, but I think I’ve got a brighter future over at Converse.

toli_kf

Kickflip

Drawing is another hobby of yours right, I remember being in the Absurd office and you showed me the sticker pack that you made.

I’ve been drawing all my life. The sticker pack was actually the first time I designed an actual product. At first, I was really happy with those drawings, but now a couple of years later I can’t look at them anymore. I would like to do some new ones, so that people can see how my style progressed.

You told me that you also do stick-and-poke tattoos. You started that at an early age right?

I did my first stick and poke tattoo at 13. My best friend asked me to do it, I was so worried something would go wrong. Tattooing at home can be unhygienic and I didn’t want him to get an infection or something. He just told me, ‘Fuck it, let’s just try it!’ That was the first one and since then I have been tattooing a lot of my friends. And as with everything, I got better with practice. This year I went out to London to work there as a tattoo artist. My work is in demand because I have my own distinct style. When I do tattoos, it’s important that the quality is always the same. People pay good money for my work and I think it’s important that I do good work every time I tattoo someone.

Where do you see Russian skateboarding going in the next couple of years?

I think last year was a good year for Russia. People are starting to recognize Russian skaters like Gosha Konyshev who had a part on Thrasher or Max Kruglov who won a lot of contests. Next year is going to be even better, though. We got so many spots and you don’t really get kicked out. I would like tell everyone you need to come and skate in Russia!

Do you think that skate brands from Russia are going to benefit from the growing interest in Russia?

I don’t know, I think the skate brands need to refresh their look. It could be good for Russian kids to see a Russian brand do well overseas and I think Russian design is really good. Absurd for example has done some great things, but right now I think we can do better. Pasha designed the new series. I haven’t seen the graphics yet, but in the past he always made great graphics so it could be the right thing at the right time. We need to keep the Russian identity, [mixed] with designs that appeal internationally.

Is there a young generation on the rise as well?

Well, we got Dima aka Dimzer Z who is a filmer, but he’s also got some crazy tricks like fakie 540’s on flat. Then there is a kid named Gleb aka I.killyou. He’s sixteen and I’m out skating with him all the time. He’s so good and I hope he’s got a bright future. They are working on the “Troica 2” video right now.

When I was partying with you in Moscow, I noticed that Russian music is really a part of the Russian party lifestyle. Do Russians really celebrate their own culture?

Well, next year I’m filming a new part and I’m pretty sure I want it to be edited to some Russian music. It’s important to use Russian things because I am from Russia. I’ve lived in Moscow my whole life, and to show people my Russian side is important to me. You need to love your hometown and your country. I could move outside of the country but I always have to come back home. My friends are here and my family is here and they are important.


Tolia’s video for Place

Interview by: Roland Hoogwater
Photos by: Alexey Lapin / @lapinotomy

The next two days are all about Tolia Titaev. Today we present you with moving images, tomorrow we present you with Tolia’s interview.

This video shows Tolia cruising with friends and having fun but it also has some pretty hard tricks like the Backside Smith grind in Paris. Tolia was a not only a big part of Place issue 55 he is also a big part of why we like Russia. We will continue to follow his path both in the skateboard world and all the other worlds he is a part of.

If you don’t know Julian Klincewicz, Stas Galaktionov and Brian Elliot. They do great work outside of skating you and you should familiarize yourself with their work.

Photo by: Alexey Lapin / @lapinotomy

When I met Sage, he told me that he often feels like the guy interviewing him becomes his friend, so he’ll talk to them about everything. Sometimes that will get him into trouble, at the same time I feel like a person who is confident enough to be himself at all times is a breath of fresh air. That doesn’t mean that some things can’t be private, but being open might make all the difference when it comes to a person’s longevity in the skateboard business. Because what interviewer likes to hear the same answers over and over again? I certainly don’t. Sage is a natural who isn’t afraid to have his friends’ back and speak up about people or things he doesn’t like. Here’s the 18 year old FA team rider from New York in his own words.

You’re on a European tour with the CONS team right now. Any interesting stories so far?
Nothing much, dudes just ripping. Motherfuckers are all good as fuck, there are not many stories though, we drove around from skatepark to skatepark, from spot to spot. I do feel like on a Europe trip it’s a lot harder to eat, I just forget to eat. In Paris for instance I just ended up eating three baguettes a day at the most, in the US it’s a lot easier because you know where to go to get some food.

Last year the Illegal Civilization crew came out with their second video, a lot of people were shocked by what they saw. Can we expect something new from IC this year?
My friend Mikey Alfred makes all the IC videos and clothes but right now he’s working with Tyler The Creator a lot so I don’t really know what’s going on. But the IC2 video was sick, it was one long big inside joke. The video is just about us hanging out and skating together, we’re a group of friends going out cruising.

A lot of people were hating on the video because they felt the video contained things like animal cruelty but I personally don’t feel like that, the video is sick! I didn’t like my footage, though. Most of my clips where too old and the tricks were weak, but Na-kel, Kevin, and Tyshawn really came through with sick parts.

Sage-Elsesser-Interview
FS Nosegrind

Is there a difference for you between a Converse Project or a Supreme type thing?
With Supreme, making a clip is super natural, we all grew up skating together and we still skate together almost everyday, it’s just the boys: we go skate, some days we might not go skate, some days are terrible and we argue, some days are great, but it’s always a lot of laughter because we are amongst friends. For me Kevin [Bradley] is just an inspirational guy. He’ll smoke ten blunts and all of a sudden he’ll start skating, Bang! He’ll land a sick trick, that makes me want to step it up a notch, too. I think there is a Supreme thing coming soon, though.

Do you feel like you do your best skating when you are amongst friends?
It depends… sometimes when I’m on a tour like this, I want to step it up a notch.

I noticed a couple of people hating on Sean [Pablo] does that happen a lot?
Yeah! I hate when people talk shit on Sean. Somebody started to try and one-up one of his tricks so when Sean landed it first, I went out on the course to show Sean some love. People are just mad because he’s 17 years old getting flown all over the world, he’s got a great style, and he’s pretty. I look at it this way, though – if people are not hating on you, you’re doing something wrong. Dylan [Rieder] is one of the best skateboarders in the world, sometimes I call him super Dylan. Sean gets a lot of the same hate Dylan gets, it’s not their fault that they are fucking gorgeous. They skate like ballerinas, it’s just natural for them, it just looks to good for some people so they start to hate on them. But Sean’s my friend, so I’ll always have his back. That’s why Fucking Awesome is the best. You can just do you, paint your nails, make your own clothes, start a ‘zine, all that stuff.

Do you get to do some of your own FA stuff?
No, Dill does all the graphics himself. Dill is like Cinderella’s step mom. He wants you to be on point, I might meet up with him and he’ll say: “That shirt sucks, take that off.” That’ll leave me feeling embarrassed at times.

I don’t think he would say that about the shirt you’re wearing now (Sage is wearing a Malcolm X T-shirt).
Hell no! This is something everybody can fuck with because it says something important: “I will join anyone, I don’t care what color you are, as long as you want to change the miserable condition that exists on this Earth.” Dill taught us a lot, though. We all came up pretty fast but at the same time it feels really natural. Dill is strict but he isn’t mean for no reason and it’s working. FA is our shit! It’s crazy when I travel to places and I see the influence we have on kids. It’s still kind of weird. Supreme did that poster of Kevin in Thrasher. (BS Tailslide as seen in the Supreme SF clip). Now kids all over the world are hanging that poster on their wall. To me, that’s so sick!

by Roland Hoogwater
Photos: Jon Coulthard

Was motiviert mehr als ein Blockbuster in 4K mit Special Effekten und einem enormen Feuerwerk? Wahrscheinlich das komplette Gegenteil: Handycam, Die Homies und ein Spot der als solcher eigentlich gar nicht bezeichnet werden müsste. Aidan Mackey, Sean Pablo, Sage Elsesser, Jerry Hsu und Logan Lara sind vielleicht auch Gründe wieso man den Clip gesehen haben sollte.